Carillon Communities University of Maryland Carillon Communities

The iGIVE Program: How Can Doing Good Create Change for Good?

I Give
I Innovate
I Volunteer
I Enable Change

 About this Program 

Have you ever wondered how to make real and lasting community change? Begin your Maryland experience by exploring your notion of doing good and investigate why change is difficult. Then use this knowledge to GIVE — give of yourself, your talents and experience to a cause you are passionate about. Give money — work as a group to invest $10,000 in social change. Through our year together, you will learn and practice the leadership and entrepreneurial skills of innovators who are changing the world ... for good.

Maryland students and leadership

The iGIVE program, housed in the School of Public Policy in connection with the Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership, will give students unique exposure to a number of projects and initiatives that the Center for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership is involved in, including the Do Good Challenge, Philanthropy Fellows Program and the Global Philanthropy Program.

Learning is anchored in the program courses taught by program faculty. This program is defined by two unique courses designed for Carillon Community students that satisfy the University of Maryland General Education requirements complemented by the Introduction to the University course. Advising of students will occur in Letters and Sciences, the students' academic home until major declaration. Students will also live together in Easton Hall.

 Learning Together: The Courses 

PUAF 214 - Leading and Investing in Social Change: Redefining and Experimenting with Philanthropy (Fall Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for I-Series and Scholarship in Practice.
Hunger, homelessness, educational inequity … these are just a few of the problems facing our community today. How do we tackle these issues? What is to be done? What can you do? This course will allow you to be an active participant and decision-maker in solving these issues. It provides you with a foundational understanding of philanthropy and the efforts of nongovernmental and nonprofit organizations. We define philanthropy as an exploration of how one develops a vision of the public good and then deploys resources to achieve an impact. You will have the opportunity to connect with leaders and expert speakers in class and learn about the effective approaches, entrepreneurial skills, and leadership required to achieve a social impact and spark a social innovation. You will explore different types of philanthropic ventures, ranging from NGOs and foundations to business and hybrid social ventures. Ultimately you and your peers will be given the opportunity and responsibility to create your own philanthropic investment fund and award a $10,000 grant to an organization working in an issue area chosen by the class. Review the organizations that have been funded by students taking similar classes at UMD.


PUAF 215 - Innovation and Social Change - Do Good Now (Spring Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for Scholarship in Practice.

Now that you have the foundational knowledge of practices for social innovation, take that learning and apply it in this dynamic scholarship in practice course. This course goes beyond the traditional lecture course by combining the imagination and creativity of transformative action for the social good with the pragmatic approach of entrepreneurship and innovation. It is team-based, highly interactive and dynamic, and provides an opportunity for students to generate solutions to a wide range of problems facing many communities today.

The course will be tailored for students in the learning community to address issues and organizations related to a topic chosen by the group. You and your peers will deepen your understanding of entrepreneurship and innovation practices by creating and implementing a team project.  These projects serve as the laboratory to implement topics such as developing and communicating a strategy and goals, project management and implementation skills, teamwork and talent management, fundraising and revenue generation, marketing and partner development, leadership skills and project sustainability. At the conclusion, students will not only leave with a deep understanding of the channels in which to create change, such as venture start-ups or the nonprofit sector, they will have also tested their projects against those of their peers in the 8-week, student run, Do Good Challenge.

UNIV 100: Introduction to the University: Carillon Communities (Fall Semester) is a one credit course that will help students craft a meaningful and purposeful University experience. This course has been designed to engage students in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship spirit and use design thinking. The course will be taught by academic advisors from Letters and Sciences working in collaboration with UMD's Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

 Living Together: The Residence Hall 

Students in the iGive program will live together.*
They will reside in Easton Hall, in the Denton Community on North Campus. In Easton Hall the Department of Residence Life offers the Syn*Quest Collaborative, a program that encourages students to collaborate in order to achieve common goals, integrate their academic and co-curricular experiences, and engage with others who are different from them. A range of activities are offered through the program including: social activities designed to help you meet other students, Guided Study Sessions offered by the Learning Assistance Center, Math Success coaching in nearby Oakland Hall, career or major exploration classes and internship preparation workshops offered by the University Counseling Center and the University Career Center, Common Ground Dialogues, special sections of EDCP 217: Introduction to Leadership, and career exploration fieldtrips.

*All students who desire to live in campus residence halls and participate in Carillon Communities must complete a Housing and Dining Agreement available at the Undergraduate Admissions Application Portal located HERE. Applications must be completed by May 1 to be guaranteed on-campus housing for 2014-2015.

 


 

University of Maryland | Office of Undergraduate Studies | Carillon Communities | carillon@umd.edu

 

The Once and Future Planet

 About this Program 

Students engaged in fieldworkStep outside the traditional classroom to explore the natural world with experts and teams of students to conduct real-time research in the field and laboratory. The Once and Future Planet program engages students in scientific research through close examination of the geological past, and prepares students for tomorrow's decisions about global environmental change.

FIREThis program partners with FIRE, the First-Year Innovation and Research Experience. FIRE facilitates inquiry-based experiences and engages students in the development of skill sets in authentic inquiry, critical thinking, innovation, and experimental design.

Learning is anchored in the program courses taught by Professor Alan Jay Kaufman , Department of Geology and the University of Maryland Distinguished Scholar-Teacher for 2014-2015. This program is defined by two unique courses designed for Carillon Community students that satisfy the University of Maryland General Education requirements, complemented by the Introduction to the University course. Advising of students occurs in Letters and Sciences, the students' academic home until major declaration. Students also live together in Easton Hall.

 Learning Together: The Courses 

GEOL 124: Evolution of Life and Environment on Planet Earth (Fall Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for I-Series and Natural Sciences. 
In this course we explore how life and environment evolved through Earth’s long history. Using deep-time geological perspectives, we follow the Mars Science Laboratory in its ongoing search for life on the red planet. Student teams investigate aspects of Martian exploration, and present their findings at four 'Curiosity' panels. Several campus field trips, and one to the Natural History Museum, are aimed to heighten student awareness of the natural world. A laboratory tour provides context for the community research project that connects students' lives to course material by exploring how diet is reflected in the chemical makeup of hair.

GEOL 224: Observations and Measurements of the Natural World (Spring Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for Scholarship in Practice and for Natural Sciences. 
This course is designed to enhance student observations of the natural world, including the use of digital visualization tools like ArcGIS, and to engage the student community in active scientific research aimed at the measurement of water quality in nearby urbanized streams of College Park. Student teams will be trained in methods required for simultaneous field sampling and measurements in state-of-the-art laboratories, as well as the compilation, interpretation and presentation of results. Campus surveys of botanical and geological features and four off-campus field trips during the spring semester will heighten awareness of natural phenomena in the world around us.

UNIV 100: Introduction to the University: Carillon Communities (Fall Semester) is a one credit course that will help students craft a meaningful and purposeful University experience. This course has been designed to engage students in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship spirit and use design thinking. The course will be taught by academic advisors from Letters and Sciences working in collaboration with UMD's Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

 Living Together: The Residence Hall 

Students in The Once and Future Planet program will live together.*
They will reside in Easton Hall, in the Denton Community on North Campus. In Easton Hall the Department of Residence Life offers the Syn*Quest Collaborative, a program that encourages students to collaborate in order to achieve common goals, integrate their academic and co-curricular experiences, and engage with others who are different from them. A range of activities are offered through the program including: social activities designed to help you meet other students, Guided Study Sessions offered by the Learning Assistance Center, Math Success coaching in nearby Oakland Hall, career or major exploration classes and internship preparation workshops offered by the University Counseling Center and the University Career Center, Common Ground Dialogues, special sections of EDCP 217: Introduction to Leadership, and career exploration fieldtrips.

*All students who desire to live in campus residence halls and participate in Carillon Communities must complete a Housing and Dining Agreement available at the Undergraduate Admissions Application Portal located HERE. Applications must be completed by May 1 to be guaranteed on-campus housing for 2014-2015.

 


 

University of Maryland | Office of Undergraduate Studies | Carillon Communities | carillon@umd.edu

 

Write Now

 About this Program 

Student at Open Mic ReadingWrite Now integrates the place of writing on campus with the culture of imaginative writing in the greater world. Students work with a distinguished writer on the faculty inside and outside the classroom. Small group workshops and activities lead to a larger course that builds on experiences and broadens study in the art of poetry.

Learning is anchored in the program courses. This program is defined by two unique courses designed for Carillon Community students that satisfy the University of Maryland General Education requirements complemented by the Introduction to the University course. In the fall semester, students will first participate in writing workshops under the mentorship of Professor Joshua Weiner, Department of English. In the spring semester students will engage with Professor Weiner in exploring the power of language. Advising of students will occur in Letters and Sciences, the students' academic home until major declaration. Students will also live together in Queen Anne's Hall.

 Learning Together: The Courses 

English 271: Writing Poems & Stories: An Introductory Workshop (Fall Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for Scholarship in Practice. Do you like reading stories and poems?  Do you like writing them?  Or maybe you have an interest in trying to write creatively, but don’t know where to start?  Are you curious about where the ideas for fiction and poetry come from, how writers find inspiration, weave verbal patterns, and cast imaginative spells?  What is the craft of writing, and what are the techniques that different writers use to make their dreaming real to others?  For this introductory course, bring an open mind, curiosity, and the willingness to work hard.  The course adds rigor to creative prompts by emphasizing critical reading of literary models. The work you’ll do includes exercises and workshop discussions with continual reference to modeling, drafting, and revising—all necessary stages in a creative process.

English 289P: Why Poetry Matters (Spring Semester) is a three credit course that meets requirements for I-Series and Humanities. The power of language finding form in poetry, in the most intensely charged interplay of sound and meaning, has provided pleasure, knowledge, wisdom, and solace since civilization's earliest days, and perhaps even before that. The art of poetry is not an artifact from the past, but a living art, changing as our use of language changes, becoming itself a vehicle for such change. This wide-ranging course introduces students to the fundamentals of poetry while exploring the role poetry plays in how we think about the human condition; what constitutes knowledge and wisdom, interior life and communal identity; and how this knowledge is to be used in confronting new challenges and the perennial questions: how to live with oneself, and as oneself; in time, and with others; here, where we reside; and elsewhere, where we imagine ourselves going.

UNIV 100: Introduction to the University: Carillon Communities (Fall Semester) is a one credit course that will help students craft a meaningful and purposeful University experience. This course has been designed to engage students in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship spirit and use design thinking. The course will be taught by academic advisors from Letters and Sciences working in collaboration with UMD's Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

 Living Together: The Residence Hall 

Students in the Write Now program will live together.*
They will reside in Queen Anne's Hall, which is a residence hall located in the North Hill Community. Queen Anne's Hall is also home to the Jiménez-Porter Writers' House, which brings together students who are in many majors. The Jimenez-Porter Writers' House offers students a literary center for the exploration of creative writing across cultures.

*All students who desire to live in campus residence halls and participate in Carillon Communities must complete a Housing and Dining Agreement available at the Undergraduate Admissions Application Portal located HERE. Applications must be completed by May 1 to be guaranteed on-campus housing for 2014-2015.

 


 

University of Maryland | Office of Undergraduate Studies | Carillon Communities | carillon@umd.edu

 

Contact

For more information contact:

Melissa Del Rios, Program Coordinator
Marie Mount 2405
carillon@umd.edu
301-405-9360

 


 

University of Maryland | Office of Undergraduate Studies | Carillon Communities | carillon@umd.edu

 

Table of Contents